Chemotherapy is Poison. No, Literally.

In 2018, an estimated 1.7 million Americans were diagnosed with cancer, and most of these patients, at some point, will likely receive chemotherapy as part of their treatment plan. This anti-cancer therapy is not one drug, but a category of drugs: All of them work by entering cells and stopping them from dividing into new cells, with the hope that they will stop tumors from growing until they fall apart and go away. Chemotherapy drugs cause considerable damage to any cells that are actively dividing in the body, leading to severe side effects including nausea, hair loss, and immunosuppression.

For that reason, we often call these drugs poisons. But there’s more truth to this designation than you might think: the oldest class of chemotherapy drugs actually derived from mustard gas, a poison the Germans used as a chemical weapon during World War I.

Continue reading “Chemotherapy is Poison. No, Literally.”

Chemical Warfare: an Assault on your Nervous System

You’re out protesting for a cause that’s near-and-dear to your heart.  You’re used to getting jostled around in the crowd, but this time things are getting out of hand.  What began as an afternoon of impassioned speeches interspersed with emphatic chants has devolved into yelling, chaos, and panic.  Suddenly, you’re drooling and your muscles are gripped tighter than ever before, paralyzing you.  Everything goes out of focus as your pupils constrict.  Trying desperately to breathe, you tumble to the ground and succumb to seizures.  You’re terrified.  Is this the end? Continue reading “Chemical Warfare: an Assault on your Nervous System”