The Citizen Scientist

Ah, the scientist. Wearer of the lab coat, gatherer of the data, publisher of findings both predictable and extraordinary.

It can be said that the scientist is the person who asks why and where, and analyzes data to come to a conclusion about a natural phenomenon on planet Earth or beyond. What scientists study ranges from biology (someone has to count those pesky invasive Asian carp in the Chicago river!) to physics (which explains why crazy uncle Gerald runs out to New Mexico with his telescope every year!). They are everywhere in our collective minds and media, ranging from Bill Nye to any number of frequent talking heads on a Discovery Channel special.  

Do these individuals need to express an unrivaled passion for a science to participate in the discipline?? Absolutely yes. But does one need a degree in the sciences to help out? Absolutely not. Continue reading “The Citizen Scientist”

How to Read Like a Scientist

It may come as some surprise, but scientists don’t spend all day mixing chemicals, measuring reactions, and hunching over open flames. To ask the right questions and design cutting-edge experiments to answer them, they have to do a lot of reading. Scientists may read about many different topics, including techniques for executing an experiment, the latest findings in their specific field, or communications from outside fields to broaden their horizons. Most of what they’re reading, scientific literature, is filled with numerical data, jargon, and what, quite frankly, looks like gibberish to non-scientists. So when people have to rely on mainstream news for their science, how can anyone expect them to figure out which scientific advancements are on the verge of completion versus those that are just bunk? Let’s take a look.
Continue reading “How to Read Like a Scientist”

It’s 2018. How is Cancer Still a Thing?

Cancer is such a scary word. It comes in many different types, and chances are, it has touched your life in some way, whether through you or a loved one. The lifetime odds that you’ll end up with cancer are about four in ten, and the odds that it takes your life are about one in five. It feels like cancer is everywhere these days, not only in personal stories, but in the fundraisers, celebrity spokespeople, and political speeches on our televisions. In a general sense, this disease can seem daunting to tackle. But on a personal level, one thing is sure – we’ve all seen the toll cancer has on our families and loved ones, and we all aim to prevent it in our own lives. Continue reading “It’s 2018. How is Cancer Still a Thing?”